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July 2019 | Published by RCPA

Issue #093

Welcome to the July issue of ePathWay

ePathway is an e-magazine designed for anyone interested in their health and wellbeing and the integral role pathology plays in the diagnosis, treatment and management of diseases.

This month’s issue of ePathway looks at the following:

  • The need to identify haemoglobinopathies when using HbA1c as a diagnostic test
  • Ebola Virus Disease; a closer look
  • An insight into genetic pathology training
  • Increased Impact Factor for RCPA journal, Pathology

With health authorities in the Democratic Republic of Congo struggling to contain a deadly outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), we spoke with Doctor Mike Catton, Deputy Director at The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity in Melbourne to learn more about this rare but severe, often fatal illness in humans. Along with other public health measures, efforts to develop an effective vaccine against Ebola virus disease (EVD) must continue.

The HbA1c test is useful in both diagnosis and monitoring the quality of glucose control in diabetes, and also assists in making treatment decisions such as adjusting insulin doses. However, there remains some debate regarding its applicability for diagnosis and, with its adoption as a diagnostic test, accurate results are vitally important and awareness of possible confounding factors such as haemoglobin variants has increased. We spoke with Associate Professor Chris Florkowski to discuss the cautions and caveats regarding using HbA1c as a diagnostic test.

Recently released 2018 reports show that the impact factor for Pathology, the official journal of the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) has increased to 3.163, marking the second consecutive year that the journal has received an impact factor over three. We spoke to Pathology Editor, Prof Delahunt to discover what an impact factor is and why Pathology has seen a dramatic annual upwards trend.

Genetic pathology is one of the newest disciplines in pathology, with genetics rapidly becoming the basis of almost every disorder. The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia runs a 5-year training program in genetic pathology, a discipline which involves the diagnosis of genetic diseases primarily by overseeing the testing of patient samples for mutations in DNA or RNA. We spoke with recent graduate Doctor Cheng Yee Nixon to discuss more about this exciting discipline, and also what is involved in the training process.

Remember to follow us on Facebook (@TheRoyalCollegeofPathologistsofAustralasia), Twitter (@PathologyRCPA) or on Instagram (@the_rcpa). CEO, Dr Debra Graves can be followed on Twitter too (@DebraJGraves).

The need to identify haemoglobinopathies when using HbA1c as a diagnostic test

The need to identify haemoglobinopathies when using HbA1c as a diagnostic test

The Haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test is a blood test which is commonly used to help diagnose and monitor people with diabetes. Although the test is formally endorsed in many countries as a form of diagnosing and monitoring type 2 diabetes, there remains some debate regarding its applicability for diagnosis. We spoke with Associate Professor Chris Florkowski to discuss the cautions and caveats regarding using HbA1c as a diagnostic test.

 

 

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Ebola Virus Disease; a closer look

Ebola Virus Disease; a closer look
On 17 July 2019, the WHO declared the ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo a public health emergency of international concern. With health authorities struggling to contain the country’s deadly outbreak where more than 1,650 people have died since it began nearly one year ago, we spoke with Doctor Mike Catton, Deputy Director at The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity in Melbourne to learn more about this severe, and often fatal, haemorrhagic disease.

 

 

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An insight into genetic pathology training

An insight into genetic pathology training
Genetic pathology is one of the newest disciplines in pathology. It involves the diagnosis of genetic diseases, primarily by overseeing the testing of patient samples for mutations in DNA or RNA. The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) runs a 5-year training program in genetic pathology, with those graduating being awarded a Fellowship of the RCPA. We spoke with recent graduate Dr Cheng Yee Nixon to discuss what is involved.

 

 

 

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Increased impact factor for RCPA journal, Pathology

Increased impact factor for RCPA journal, Pathology
Professor Brett Delahunt
The impact factor is the most widely used tool for measuring the importance or rank of a journal. The higher the impact factor, the more highly ranked the journal. Recently released 2018 reports show that the impact factor for Pathology, the official journal of the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) has increased to 3.163. Pathology Editor, Prof Delahunt has thanked the Pathology Editorial Board, reviewers, authors and readers who continue to support the journal and contribute to its international success.

 

 

 

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